Dominionism. A religio-political movement with pervasive influence in the Christian Right that stresses the need for Christians to exercise dominion--control--over both nature and human institutions. As it is chiefly an American phenomenon, Dominionism's manifestation in practical terms is see in an array of efforts aimed at control of the political and governmental institutions and processes of the United States. Dominionism's adherents are typically conservative Protestants, including Fundamentalists and conservative evangelicals. As is the case with many (though not all) members of the Christian Right in general, most people ascribing to and influenced by dominionism insist that the United States was founded as a Christian nation, (see AU.org "Is America a 'Christian Nation?'") therefore they see their efforts as a Christian reclamation of American society.

(see Dominionist Theology and Christian Reconstructionism)

usage. "dominionism" or "Dominionism"

(see Frederick Clarkson's, "The Rise of Dominionism: Remaking America as a Christian Nation")

Chip Berlet of Political Research Associates describes dominionism as

"a tendency among Protestant Christian evangelicals and fundamentalists that encourages them to not only be active political participants in civic society, but also seek to dominate the political process as part of a mandate from God."

(Note: Berlet credits author Sara Diamond as popularizing the term "dominionism")

(see Chip Berlet's four-part essay on dominionism, "The Christian Right, Dominionism, and Theocracy")

Frederick Clarkson in The Public Eye (Winter 2005), writes

"Dominionists celebrate Christian nationalism, in that they believe the the United States once was, and should once again be, a Christian nation. In this way, they deny the Englightenment roots of American democracy."

(see ReligiousTolerance.org "Christian Reconstructionism, Dominion Theology, and Theonomy")

(see the chart of sectors of the U.S. right, including Dominionists, here)